Coins 270 Julia Titi, daughter of Titus (died 90 AD). AR Denarius, c. 80-81 AD. D/ IVLIA IMP T AVG F AVGVSTA. Draped bust right. R/ Vesta seated left, holding palladium and sceptre; in exergue, VESTA. RIC (Titus) 57. C. 16. AR. g. 2.77 mm. 18.00 RR. Very rare. An appealing delicate portrait, glossy cabinet tone with light iridescent hues. Good VF. As so often was the case with Imperial women, Julia Titi, one of two daughters of Titus, was destined to be a dynastic pawn. While still young Titus tried to convince his younger brother Domitian to marry her (just as Claudius had married his niece Agrippina), but he was already married to Domitia, and refused on that account. Instead Julia Titi married a second cousin, Flavius Sabinus, a grandson of Vespasian’s famous brother. But their respective marriages could not keep Domitian and Julia Titi apart, and for years they engaged in a secret affair. When Titus succeeded his father as emperor in 79, he bestowed on his daughter the title of Augusta. The enduring love affair of Julia Titi and Domitian only came to be known publicly in about 83, when Domitian exiled his wife. Uncle and niece soon were openly living together in the palace, and Domitian executed Julia’s husband in the following year on the flimsiest imaginable charge. Their incestuous affair did not end pleasantly, though: Julia died in 90 or 91 of fatal complications of an attempted abortion. This was a terrible blow to Domitian, who deified Julia Titi and eventually recalled his wife Domitia from exile. His devotion was proven in the end, when one of his nurses, presumably acting on a wish Domitian had expressed near the end of his life, mixed his ashes with those of Julia Titi. (NAC 94,175 note).

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